Instant Runoff Voting

A Half-Time Analysis of the Summit That Could Shape the Future of the Internet

  • By
  • Danielle Kehl,
  • Tim Maurer,
  • New America Foundation
December 13, 2012 |

The latest battle over who governs the Internet is taking place right now. Representatives from more than 150 nations gathered in Dubai last Monday for the World Conference on International Telecommunications, a two-week meeting hosted by the International Telecommunication Union, a specialized agency of the United Nations. Their mission: to renegotiate International Telecommunications Regulations treaty, which governs global interconnection and interoperability of telecommunications traffic. The outcome could change how the Internet works.

What the Oscars Can Teach Us About Democracy

February 21, 2011
(cross posted at Zocalo Public Square)

Who should prevail in a popularity contest featuring several choices? Should one measure depth or breadth of support?

I Cry for Don Perata

November 23, 2010
(cross posted at Fox & Hounds Daily)

It is terrible what happened to Don Perata in the race for Oakland mayor.

Did you hear? The man who ruled the state senate lost his bid to be mayor of Oakland. And it’s just so unfair, as many of Perata’s supporters have made clear. Perata’s consultant John Whitehurst declared that the election outcome had been “an injustice, and Oakland will pay the price.”

Instant Runoff Voting Empowers Communities of Color

May 18, 2010

A panel of political experts convened to advise citizens and candidates how to campaign under an Instant Runoff Voting system all agreed that IRV has cut down on negative campaigning in San Francisco and has forced candidates to broaden their efforts to include outreach to communities often ignored in political contests.

IRV Special Elections Bill Advances in California Legislature

May 4, 2010

Instant Runoff Voting (IRV) just took a key step forward in the California statehouse.

A New Era of Politics: Campaigning with Ranked Choice Voting

Thursday, May 13, 2010 - 12:00pm

This November, Oakland, Berkeley and San Leandro will join San Francisco in using Ranked Choice Voting (RCV) to elect local offices. With RCV, voters can rank a first, second and third choice, and winning candidates are elected in a single November election instead of over two elections in June and November. This boosts turnout, saves taxpayers the cost of a second election and saves candidates the cost of fundraising for two elections.

Landmark Federal Case Upholds Ranked Choice Voting

April 19, 2010

In a landmark opinion issued late on Friday, Federal District Court Judge Richard Seeborg upheld the constitutionality of San Francisco's Ranked Choice Voting method, the first time a federal court has weighed in on the subject of Instant Runoff Voting. Judge Seeborg decisively rejected a legal challenge which claimed the city's voting method was defective because it limited voters to ranking three candidates in any one race.

Landmark Federal Case Upholds Instant Runoff Voting

April 17, 2010

In a landmark opinion issued late on Friday, Federal District Court Judge Richard Seeborg upheld the constitutionality of San Francisco’s Ranked Choice Voting method, the first time a federal court has weighed in on the subject of Instant Runoff Voting (IRV).

Federal Judge Likely to Reject IRV Challenge

April 1, 2010
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At a hearing in San Francisco today, Federal District Court Judge Richard Seeborg said he was likely to reject a challenge to San Francisco’s Ranked Choice Voting system. This was the first—and perhaps last—hearing on a lawsuit challenging the particular methodology of San Francisco’s Ranked Choice (or Instant Runoff) Voting system. The plaintiffs in the case, led by perennial losing San Francisco candidate Ron Dudum, argue that San Francisco’s system is unconstitutional because it limits voters to vote for three candidates at a time.

The plaintiffs have a tough sell.

Federal Judge Likely to Reject Challenge to Ranked Choice Voting in San Francisco

April 1, 2010

SAN FRANCISCO--A federal judge said today he was "not inclined" to issue an injunction against San Francisco's Ranked Choice Voting system.

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