Elections & Political Parties

Hurricane Sandy as Greek Tragedy

  • By
  • Mark Hertsgaard,
  • New America Foundation
October 30, 2012 |

Never has a hurricane been more aptly, if tragically, named than Sandy, the superstorm that flooded New York City and battered much of the East Coast. At press time, the storm had killed at least forty-three people and caused an estimated $32 billion in damages to buildings and infrastructure—figures expected to increase in the coming days as emergency personnel pick through the wreckage—and left 8 million homes without electricity.

Politics in a Time of Crisis: Sandy? Blame Socialism

  • By
  • Haroon Moghul,
  • New America Foundation
October 30, 2012 |

Last year I was in Queens, and I over-prepared. I took Hurricane Irene seriously, though she wasn’t as bad as the worst predictions warned us. Just about one year later, however, another and far worse hurricane, a supposed once-in-a-century event, has slammed into New York City. Sadly, some have lost their lives, and millions more are affected.

It Doesn’t Matter Who Wins

  • By
  • Andrés Martinez,
  • New America Foundation
October 30, 2012 |

The big day is a week out. The campaigns and their allies are closing in on $2 billion spent; cable TV pundits are hoarse from months of spin and the urgency of the countdown; anxious partisans on both sides check daily tracking polls the way the superstitious look to their horoscope; the candidates are flying across the country nearly around the clock, appearing before ever larger crowds, their rhetoric raw, shed of any previous restraint. Because, as everyone keeps saying, the stakes have never been higher. Except they have been.

A Foreign-Policy Mystery: Six Areas the Debate Missed

  • By
  • Steve Coll,
  • New America Foundation
October 26, 2012 |

The final Presidential debate, devoted to foreign policy, was the most reasoned and the least polluted by rehearsed talking points of the three. The format and the moderator helped: the candidates sat side by side at a table, close to Bob Schieffer, of CBS News, who conducts interviews of this kind every Sunday morning on “Face the Nation”; his confidence showed, and the roundtable feeling seemed to calm everyone down.

Programs:

The Sidebar: All Over the Map

October 26, 2012
Steve Coll, Jamie Zimmerman and Ali Gharib highlight the glaring omissions and surprising moments of the presidential foreign policy debate, and grade the candidates' global talking point. Elizabeth Weingarten hosts.

Answer Me This...

October 25, 2012

With the last of the three debates completed and the presidential election just around the corner, the New America Foundation has pulled together this video with people from our various policy teams to ask the candidates a few final questions about how they plan to govern. Check us out, tell us what you think, and if you seeeither candidate answering any of the questions, let us know--tweet to us at @NewHealthDialog and @NewAmerica!

There's Nothing Foreign About Foreign Policy

  • By
  • Romesh Ratnesar,
  • New America Foundation
October 25, 2012 |

It took barely half an hour for Barack Obama and Mitt Romney to change the subject of their final debate from foreign to domestic policy. Responding to moderator Bob Schieffer’s question—“What is America’s role in the world?”—the candidates launched into their respective plans for rebuilding the U.S. economy. Obama talked about creating manufacturing jobs; Romney vowed to support entrepreneurs. Then they sparred over the merits of hiring more public school teachers.

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Meet Mitt Romney, Mellow Internationalist

  • By
  • Romesh Ratnesar,
  • New America Foundation
October 23, 2012 |

Neither Barack Obama nor Mitt Romney had much to gain from Monday night’s foreign-policy debate. After four years, the country is familiar and largely comfortable with Obama’s handling of foreign affairs. The president’s principal goal was to remind voters, as early and often as possible, that he is the president who killed Osama bin Laden. Romney’s objective was even simpler: avoid any embarrassing gaffes that could halt his campaign’s momentum and raise doubts about his fitness to be commander-in-chief.

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Romney Endorses Obama's National Security Policies

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • New America Foundation
October 23, 2012 |

Mitt Romney came to Monday night's debate with a choice.

He could run to the right of President Obama on national security issues and also differentiate himself on such tricky matters as what to do about Syria, or the United States' complicated alliance with Pakistan.

Or he could essentially endorse Obama's aggressive campaign against American enemies such as al Qaeda and the Iranian regime and his administration's approach to knotty problems such as Syria and Afghanistan.

Obama Wins Second Debate, But Romney Scores With Centrist, Likable Storyline

  • By
  • Peter Beinart,
  • New America Foundation
October 17, 2012 |

The big question about the second debate of the presidential campaign—and perhaps the entire presidential campaign itself—is this: is this now a contest between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney or Mitt Romney and himself?

If it’s the former, Obama won tonight. Like Joe Biden before him, he spent more time on the offensive. He not only came out of the Libya discussion, potentially his most perilous, unscathed, but he flat-out won that portion of the night. He repeatedly and lucidly unloaded all the anti-Romney material that he didn’t mention in the first debate.

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